Veröffentlicht am Schreib einen Kommentar

Moyee and FairChain inspire the German policymakers

Bilt plaatjes

Moyee and FairChain inspire the German policymakers

Speaking to politicians and expecting results takes patience but little strokes fell big oaks, right? Here’s a brief recap of our activistic journey over the last few months and how far we got along in abolishing the German coffee tax for fair coffee. 

Last Monday, Germany’s Ministers of Development and Labour visited Ethiopia for a meeting with the Ethiopian Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize winner Abiy Ahmed Ali in Addis Ababa. Hubertus Heil (Minister of Labour) and Gerd Müller (Minister of Economic Cooperation and Development) are clearly in favour of abolishing the coffee tax for fair grown and processed coffee in order to create a competitive advantage for products that comply with minimum social standards.

“Ach habe Olaf Scholz daran erinnert, dass er als Hamburger Senator die Abschaffung der Kaffeesteuer auf fairen Kaffee gefordert hat – das wäre jetzt ein schöner Akt, wenn er das einlösen würde.”

Gerd Muller- Bundesentwicklungsminister

The news here: before, Gerd Müller only mentioned the coffee tax to be abolished for FairTrade-certified coffee. This is the first time he acknowledges that there’s more to fair coffee than just a FairTrade label and that it “should be possible to create more value through roasting in the country of origin”.

Our engagement for the removal of the coffee tax for fair coffee started when we explored the German coffee market and discovered that Germany is one of the very few countries in the EU to apply it. When we attended the 19th Annual Conference of the German Council for Sustainable Development in June 2019, Gerd Müller spoke about the topic, yet seemed uninformed about the deeper, underlying issues. How come he only talks about FairTrade Coffee? FairTrade was an important movement starting out 30 years ago, but today – as we face an even more alarming race to the bottom – a certification is not the easy solution for a complex problem. 

It was time to make a statement that we need to rethink value creation in coffee overall. To raise the bar and set a new standard. We decided to write an Open Letter to the Minister and explain why the coffee value chain is broken and how we can fix it. Major German news outlet taz.de reported.

A couple of months later, Moyee Coffee and FairChain applied for the Coffee Innovation Fund, provided by the GIZ (the German Society for International Cooperation). We applied among 200 other applicants to advance innovation in coffee producing countries such as Ethiopia, Myanmar, Indonesia and Vietnam. For Ethiopia, Moyee Coffee Germany and FairChain Foundation have been granted financial support among four other Coffee Changemakers. We couldn’t be more proud!

None of the many German media that reported on the Minister’s visit in Ethiopia (FAZ, Tagesschau, Die Zeit, BILD) mentioned that they had another meeting. Gerd Müller himself awarded Moyee Coffee and FairChain Foundation with the grant issued by the GIZ. Five months in and a couple of minutes face time with the Minister finally puts our point top of the agenda.

Now that’s what we call momentum. This is just the beginning. Let’s get ready to rumble!

TWO OF THE 6 WINNING PROJECTS ARE FAIRCHAIN INNOVATIONS

 

 

Video abspielen

opinie stuk

 

taz archive
Veröffentlicht am Schreib einen Kommentar

Digitization: The Next Giant Leap for Global Coffee Communities

Digitization: The Next Giant Leap for Global Coffee Communities

Increasingly, consumers want to know the source of the products they consume. They want transparent supply chains, and sustainable sourcing, and rightly so. With transparency comes opportunity, and with opportunity, greater equality. At Moyee Coffee, we take equality at face value – our mission is to create a brand that splits our profits 50/50 with the  producers in the country of origin. That starts by ensuring that our farmers receive a REAL living income, along with all other supply chain actors, from bean to cup. To prove this impact, we ensure maximum supply chain transparency through our integrated blockchain technology.

“Digitalization is the next great leap for global coffee communities. Without digitalization, there is no blockchain, there is no transparency, and there is no proof of sustainable sourcing. This is the reason Moyee is investing so greatly in digitalizing its farming communities, to demonstrate the true cost of every step of the supply chain - first in Ethiopia, then beyond.”

Michael: First Mile Impact officer

Today, cash payments are common practice in the coffee world. Farmers bring their beans to washing stations (processing sites), weigh and wash their cherries and receive cash on the spot. The only proof that these transactions ever took place is a handwritten receipt. It’s not the most fool proof system for establishing traceability or provenance. It’s also a difficult and inefficient system for the farmers, who have to then bring their receipts to payment officers to receive money for their coffee cherries. Aside from the inefficiency, the system also poses a security risk with so much cash around.

Leading into our recent harvest, our goal was to introduce an easier and more efficient system that is also safer for our farmers. A system that didn’t just solve these issues at a community level, but also  empowered them individually and financially. For help, we turned to a local bank and worked with them to create a system that was more efficient for our farmers and their communities. The bank was willing and able – what bank doesn’t want more clients? – but the obstacles were many.

 

Overcoming the many obstacles

There are serious obstacles standing in the way of digitalizing payments in a country like Ethiopia. The first, Ethiopian farmers, like most, distrust banks. The second, is the focus on the short-term in sub-Saharan Africa, at the cost of long-term commitment and the financial security it brings. This is by no means a critique, but a reality. It’s hard to plan for the future when you don’t know where your next meal is coming from. 

To overcome these obstacles at our recent harvest, we set out to demonstrate the tangible benefits of banking by emphasizing safety and the potential for empowerment. Digitalizing payments means that farmers no longer need to carry around large amounts of cash on pay day. Nor do they have to hide that cash in their homes. In fact, when banked, farmers no longer have to make the often tedious journey to our washing station to receive their payments. They just need to go to the nearest ATM.

Before the harvest began, approximately a third of the members in our coffee collective had bank accounts. Unfortunately, only a few of these were women, so we focused much of our attention on them. We saw digitalizing banking as a powerful opportunity to empower women. After all, direct access to bank accounts gives them greater autonomy over both their personal and family finances.

To convince our community – and again, the women in particular – of the benefits of a bank account, we invited the bank staff themselves to our farm during the harvest. There, they spoke directly with our community members and created bank accounts for them on the spot. Of the 371 new bank accounts opened during our last harvest, 93 of them were by women.

Empowering women

By any measure, our financial empowerment program during the recent harvest was a great success. In banking nearly 400 new farmers, we also provided them with one-on-one financial training, and issued them ID cards with unique QR codes that give them access to a personalized digital wallet. The personalized digital wallets are important in that they enable Moyee consumers to transfer value to our farmers directly. This is going to revolutionize the conventional consumer-producer relationship, and is a crucial step to providing our farmers a REAL living income.

Our focus now is encouraging and engaging our community to embrace this new digital system, and making sure the benefits are visible. We believe we will create a chain reaction across the community, with more and more members opening bank accounts once they see the tangible benefits enjoyed by their neighbours.

Finally, we took the time to set up a Women Empowerment Committee, which will function as a platform for our upcoming Microloans Project. Empowering women and integrating their needs and perceptions into our strategies is absolutely essential to our success. And to think, we’re only getting started…

 

Veröffentlicht am Schreib einen Kommentar

Digitization: Empowering farmers through use of technology

female partipation 1

Digitization: Empowering farmers through use of technology

4 brave women spent many weeks amongst our farmers to do research on how our technology could empower farmers. Read all about it in this whitepaper. Big thanks to Satih den Dekker, Myrthe Jeuken, Chanti van der Kust & Iepke Rijcken.

“The ones adding most to our living income roadmap seem the most difficult to reach. Young woman!.”

Chanti- Researcher
Veröffentlicht am Schreib einen Kommentar

Moyee FairChain Academy

Moyee FairChain Academy

On this page we will add more an more 

“Digitalization is the next great leap for global coffee communities. Without digitalization, there is no blockchain, there is no transparency, and there is no proof of sustainable sourcing. This is the reason Moyee is investing so greatly in digitalizing its farming communities, to demonstrate the true cost of every step of the supply chain - first in Ethiopia, then beyond.”

Michael: First Mile Impact officer

Today, cash payments are common practice in the coffee world. Farmers bring their beans to washing stations (processing sites), weigh and wash their cherries and receive cash on the spot. The only proof that these transactions ever took place is a handwritten receipt. It’s not the most fool proof system for establishing traceability or provenance. It’s also a difficult and inefficient system for the farmers, who have to then bring their receipts to payment officers to receive money for their coffee cherries. Aside from the inefficiency, the system also poses a security risk with so much cash around.

Leading into our recent harvest, our goal was to introduce an easier and more efficient system that is also safer for our farmers. A system that didn’t just solve these issues at a community level, but also  empowered them individually and financially. For help, we turned to a local bank and worked with them to create a system that was more efficient for our farmers and their communities. The bank was willing and able – what bank doesn’t want more clients? – but the obstacles were many.

 

Overcoming the many obstacles

There are serious obstacles standing in the way of digitalizing payments in a country like Ethiopia. The first, Ethiopian farmers, like most, distrust banks. The second, is the focus on the short-term in sub-Saharan Africa, at the cost of long-term commitment and the financial security it brings. This is by no means a critique, but a reality. It’s hard to plan for the future when you don’t know where your next meal is coming from. 

To overcome these obstacles at our recent harvest, we set out to demonstrate the tangible benefits of banking by emphasizing safety and the potential for empowerment. Digitalizing payments means that farmers no longer need to carry around large amounts of cash on pay day. Nor do they have to hide that cash in their homes. In fact, when banked, farmers no longer have to make the often tedious journey to our washing station to receive their payments. They just need to go to the nearest ATM.

Before the harvest began, approximately a third of the members in our coffee collective had bank accounts. Unfortunately, only a few of these were women, so we focused much of our attention on them. We saw digitalizing banking as a powerful opportunity to empower women. After all, direct access to bank accounts gives them greater autonomy over both their personal and family finances.

To convince our community – and again, the women in particular – of the benefits of a bank account, we invited the bank staff themselves to our farm during the harvest. There, they spoke directly with our community members and created bank accounts for them on the spot. Of the 371 new bank accounts opened during our last harvest, 93 of them were by women.

Empowering women

By any measure, our financial empowerment program during the recent harvest was a great success. In banking nearly 400 new farmers, we also provided them with one-on-one financial training, and issued them ID cards with unique QR codes that give them access to a personalized digital wallet. The personalized digital wallets are important in that they enable Moyee consumers to transfer value to our farmers directly. This is going to revolutionize the conventional consumer-producer relationship, and is a crucial step to providing our farmers a REAL living income.

Our focus now is encouraging and engaging our community to embrace this new digital system, and making sure the benefits are visible. We believe we will create a chain reaction across the community, with more and more members opening bank accounts once they see the tangible benefits enjoyed by their neighbours.

Finally, we took the time to set up a Women Empowerment Committee, which will function as a platform for our upcoming Microloans Project. Empowering women and integrating their needs and perceptions into our strategies is absolutely essential to our success. And to think, we’re only getting started…