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Taking stock – going the extra mile

taking stock going the extra mile

Impact update september 2022

If we as consumers have learned anything these past few years, things happening on the other side of the globe can affect our lives here. And coffee is no different. 

Getting green beans  – or roasted value-added coffee in our case – from the Coffee Belt near the equator to the other side of the world isn’t always easy. Particularly when you add in the challenges of Covid 19, disruption by the Russian war in Ukraine (the port of Rotterdam being able to take a container of our coffee for 2 weeks was one example of this!), sudden increases in demand, and general shipping pressures since the pandemic.

'We didn't start Moyee to sell coffee, we started moyee to prove that business models and supply chains can be structured in a radically different way and can contribute to lowering global inequality'

FairChain in a nutshell

Here’s our attempt to keep things simple. Normally, a coffee bean begins life as a cherry growing on a coffee plant attended to by farmers.

Once harvested, the beans are washed, cleaned, and dried and become what we call green (unprocessed) beans. In their journey from highlands to harbours for export, various middlemen handle the green beans and take a small piece of the profit. The roasting and packaging of green beans takes place almost exclusively abroad, primarily because this is where the real value is created.

''In the last 25 years, 5 ginormous coffee multinationals have hijacked the coffee chain, creating a huge economic imbalance between coffee-producing and coffee-consuming countries.''

Big Coffee thrives on squeezing the margins out of coffee-producing countries. The price of a cappuccino has exploded in the last few years, but coffee producers have seen none of that extra value. Actually, it’s worse than that. They’re earning less now than ever before – just 10% of the total value ends up in their hands. It used to be 47% of the value!

What moyee coffee does

Moyee FairChain Coffee is an alternative to all that. Our coffee is grown on wild forest-shaded coffee plants and handpicked by the farmers.

By roasting in the country of origin instead of exporting away green beans, more profit remains in the hands of the men and women who contribute the greatest to the chain. 

At the heart of FairChain is a 50/50 approach that aims to create an equal value split between countries that produce coffee and countries that consume it.

The future - conscious consumerism

Covid-19 has been as devastating as it has been eye-opening. We witnessed heroic acts of solidarity. We saw a global economy come to a screeching halt and rapid inflation as it reopened. While at the time of writing the future is still very much uncertain, there is a large group of people who will want to return to life as normal.

However, we believe there will be an even larger group open to new economic alternatives and a world filled with less pollution, less stress, less consumption, more mindfulness, less plastic crap. People who demand a healing economy over one that is devastating our planet and catering almost exclusively to the richest 1%.

As a brand, we will stand by this new class of conscious consumers. People who will choose a single cup of (specialty) coffee that respects people and planet over two cups of (poverty) coffee that generates perverse profits for the privileged few while paying no heed to our planet. The future is bright for purpose-driven brands!

our big plans - work left to do

To balance the global coffee chain:

  1. Scale up from low-volume premium exporters (from Ethiopia and Kenya) to high-volume premium exporters.
  2. Fire up our roasting activities in Kenya and Colombia to raise the percentage of truly locally-roasted FairChain coffee to the 90% we aim for. (We will continue to roast small batches via our Amsterdam HQ in case of supply chain hiccups or for product development).
  3. Change the profile of our Impact Ecosystem so that it is less reliant on a single roastery in Ethiopia and can spread the risk of logistical hiccups across multiple roasteries.
  4. Combine our best practices in Holland, Ireland and Germany for a pan-European roll-out and make inroads into America.

This is no easy task and only possible with your support. We do it the hard (and Fair!) way, because we value doing it right.  

EXPLORE OUR IMPACT REPORT

Curious about the impact we make? Join the journey of our impact report.

Convinced by fairChain? Get your Moyee coffee here:

SINGLE

from 7,60€

Fresh & Fruity

DOUBLE

from 7,13€

Fruity & Sweet

TRIPLE

from 6,65€

Full & Round

DARK

from 6,18€

Dark & Strong

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Moyee B Corp 2022

Best-for-the-world-bcorp-video

Yesssss, Moyee is recognized again as the Best For the World B Corp.
Yet another heartwarming recognition for our FairChain mission and our relentless fight for a coffee supply chain based on equality.
There are over 3500 B Corps in 70 countries all putting purpose at the center of their activities. Each year the top 5% is recognized as Best for the World.
B Corps have been nominated for being best in either one of the five impact areas: Governance, Workers, Environment, Community, and Customers. Best of The World are the B Corps which are recognized as the top 5% of their size group in each specific area.⁠ So far we won the award in the Community section four times!
Thanks, bcorporation to offer this platform to share our impact practices. Together with all other B Corps, we show that our vision of a transformed global economic system that benefits all people, communities, and the planet is not only achievable but also highly rewarding!⁠
Want to know more about Moyee as a B Corp? Check our B Corp profile:


Best for the World

July 14, 2022

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Drop the trash

THE TRUE COST

OF Black Friday

HALLELUJAH.. THE FESTIVE SEASON IS AROUND THE CORNER...

And so is today our big dear friend Black Friday….

Retailers offering everything they can possibly think of with big discounts for consumers to drastically change in wild crazy animals.
And then they lock them up and slaughter them. Wuhu.. Figuratively.
It’s called capitalism and consumerism.

Very profit friendly, not very people and planet-friendly.

But who cares when one can get a big, wide TV 80% off??

Well… We all should, or at least, if we care about our survival and about the future of humanity. 

smashing down the discount buttons...

It’s all fun now. Or, in fact, not really. Not even now. Retailers and firms on the end of the chain affecting and messing up the whole chain is a real thing. Smashing the discount buttons is like flicking the first stone in a domino game. There they go, like lightening up a match in the rainforest. There it goes. It’s basically like the start of the end, a systematic environmental collapse, and then priced at a discount. Katsjing: we are buying into our own destruction.

What is going to be your gift for yourself on Black Friday? An extra 10 years for your future grandchildren, accessible education for children in developing countries, or perhaps maybe just the more giant TV for in your bedroom? Because hey: “Another TV won’t make the difference, right?”; “The end is not that close by”; “Me changing my behavior is not going to make the change”; “If it really were that bad, then somebody would be stopping us.”

Well… Guess… The world is screaming and trying to stop us, but we keep our eyes and ears shut. Only listening to the language we know: the human language. That screams “MORE MORE MORE”.

We are compromising our survival, doubling down on destruction: bigger cars, bigger TVs, bigger houses, more money, bigger wallets, lower prices.

COuld have been saved during this Black Friday:

0
TONS OF CARBON EMISSIONS

=

0
RETURN FLIGHTS BETWEEN LONDON AND SYDNEY
0
KILO BLUE WHALES

ARE WE BRAINWASHED?

Call us crazy, lunatic dreamers, but we refuse to believe that the last 200 years of hardcore capitalistic brainwash (thank you, Adam Smith &co.) has indoctrinated us to these numb egocentric consumers. As much as we are being encouraged to forget, before being consumers, we are also individuals, people, and humans deep down. Humans that are interconnected with all the biodiversity and systems around us. 

People that take specific actions because they want a happy life on a healthy planet with healthy and strong relationships.

This is why THIS Black Friday, we invite you to drop that greedy consumer side inside of you, drop the trashy consumerism urges, and come back to the person who is aware of the actual cost of his/her decisions.

The person who is aware of the climate clock ticking… And the sustainable development goals we agreed to achieve together. Time is running and we are NOT too late yet. 

For all goals CLICK HERE

deadline to achieving sustainability goals:

Days
Hours
Minutes
Seconds

LETS TALK ABOUT TRUE COST

Research done by money.co.uk has found that online shoppers during this Black Friday could emit over 386,234 tons of carbon emissions into the atmosphere. That is equivalent to 215,778 return flights between London and Sydney and has the same weight as 3,679 blue whales (Haqqi, 2021). A Friday indeed has never looked that dark.

Yet.. We might have forgot that….

We as human beings are entirely dependent on the world’s natural systems: the atmosphere, the soil, the oceans, the rainforests. It is all intertwined. 

We are the insects in the planet’s cobweb of life: and indeed, the spider is an enormous powerful forces with eight legs holding bags filled with an enormous amount of money. 

Scholars studying the complexity theory (Battiston et al., 2016) argue the same behavior from complex systems: a banking network, a real estate, a rainforest, or the dead sea; it is behaving following specific mathematical rules. “In normal conditions, the system regulates itself, maintaining a state of equilibrium. It can absorb stress up to a certain point. But then it suddenly flips. It passes a tipping point and then falls into a new state of equilibrium which is often impossible to reverse.

The closer the complex system comes to its critical threshold, the more its outputs begin to “flicker.” The flickering phenomenon is when a system switches back and forth between alternative states in response to a relatively large impact (R. Wang et al., 2012).

The closer it comes to the tipping point, the wilder the fluctuations. 
And last year’s heatwaves, massive fires, and lethal floods show how close we are to collapsing. The fluctuations are wild, and climate change is real.

Climate change affects the social and environmental determinants of health—clean air, safe drinking water, sufficient food a secure shelter. And we, here, safe and sound making our sweet Black Friday lists, spending money, are the least affected from this all. People in developing countries with weak infrastructure will be the least able to cope without any assistance to prepare and respond. A report constructed by the United Nations argues that families living in poverty systematically occupy the least desirable land to damage from climate hazards, such as mud slides, periods of abnormally hot water, water contamination and flooding: climate change has the potential to worsen their situation and thereby worsen pre-existent inequalities (2016).

how long does the shopping buzz last?

It is only human nature to believe that you need to buy that item now because you will save money. But… Really? Would you really end up buying that pair of shoes, those air pods, that new blouse if they weren’t on sale? I hear you thinking… Probably not, right? Low prices seem appealing in the short term, but all of us will eventually pay the external cost. Indeed, the true cost of unsustainable consumption and overproduction is based on the exploitation of raw materials, workers, and the environment. It is time that we stop taking up the deals, re-think our shopping behavior, and let brands know that it is not okay to overproduce.

 

here at moyee...

We are very far from being perfect and not naive enough to believe that we have tackled the world’s complexity to really calculate the true cost of our coffee, but really, we have been doing the most to try! Poverty, child labor, climate change, deforestation, loss of biodiversity, forced migrations… All these ingredients can be found on almost every cup of coffee and, unfortunately for free.

Using the True Price method, we can reduce social and environmental costs and ensure they are included in our true price. 
Our ambition is to offer the coffee world a business model that reduces the “dark ingredients” you do not pay for and what subsequently helps fund positive externalities; such as a living income for the farmers and reforestation programs.

buy less, buy better

True pricing can transform our economic system in three phases: first by creating transparency, second by enabling the remediation of hidden costs, and finally by creating a level playing field (TruePrice, 2021). And you can transform the system by just asking yourself twice if you really need it, if you would purchase the discounted item, if you would have calculated the true price if the discounted price would equal the external costs of harming the planet and with it the earth.

This Black Friday, we invite you to drop the trash you don’t need in your life

Your choices are your greatest power. Choose wisely.

choose wisely.

want to read more about our impact?

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Our Environmental Impact

Our Environmental Impact
moyee is carbon positive. with each kilo of moyee you help fight climate change

Lets Fix the Future! (3/3)

In this series, you can find 3 blogposts that shortly explain our main impact pillars, economic, social, and environmental impact or Factories – Farmers – Forests.

It’s called ‘Let’s Fix the Future!’ because a lot needs to be fixed. COVID-19 raised all sorts of havoc, but maybe most of all it unveiled society’s deep social riffs and the ever-rising inequality that is leading to ever-greater poverty, deforestation and climate change. One thing is clear: now more than ever we need better business models designed to solve these problems rather than continue to add to them.

With FairChain and Moyee, we’re building our company around Economic, Social and Environmental impact. How this is impacting us and, well, you, is in the report. We hope we can inspire you to make a difference, and please feel free to give us your feedback. 

Thanks for supporting us over the years and…. Let’s Fix the Future together.

Cheers!
Guido & Team Moyee

Let's talk numbers!

When talking environmental goals, the figure our stakeholders care about most is our carbon footprint.

Broken down, we see our carbon footprint is lowest at the farmer level. This is because our farmers hand-pick the cherries and avoid pesticides and artificial fertilizers. A recent win in our journey to reduce the footprint of our coffee was shipped to Ethiopia in 2020: a container full of solar panels. We will use these panels to replace the diesel generator at our Ethiopian wet mill, which will immediately lower our carbon footprint. 

To measure the environmental impact of FairChain we’ve created a fairly simple framework with three main impact indicators:

Raketje_environmental.png
0 kg

carbon footprint

Most coffees have a carbon footprint of 8 or 9 kg of CO2 for every 1kg bag of coffee, but with Moyee our carbon footprint is 5.4 kg. We still believe we can radically improve on this.  

 

0 MTON

carbon surplus

But our supply chain also enjoys a carbon surplus of 795 tons, which means we absorb 95 tons more CO2 than we emit. Uniquely, this surplus is largely the result of our own ambitious carbon insetting program at our farm in Mizan where we are  protecting 373 hectares of natural forest tree planting in Ethiopia. Soon we’ll be able to increase our surplus even more by planting 400,000 coffee trees, which will absorb a further 1,900 tons of CO2. 

0 Hectares

of forest protected

Over the last few years Moyee has been working hard to redesign our business model to not only battle deforestation, but to win back the forests already lost, to enable our coffee farmers to earn a living income from their beans while rewarding and celebrating their agroforestry coffee production.

moyee is the only coffee company that consumes more co2 than it produces. with each kilo you drink you help fight climate change

As we learned more about the challenges our farmers faced, it became massively clear to us how intertwined their futures were with our futures. As forest dwellers, our farmers are on the frontline of climate change. Their environmentally-friendly farming methods protect forests – forests necessary for our own survival in the west. 

That said, over the last 20 years Ethiopia has lost approximately 18% of its forests, the equivalent of 71,100 thousand hectares, enough trees to absorb the entire annual CO2 emissions of The Netherlands. Each year, Ethiopia loses another 140,000 hectares to deforestation.

By working in the coffee industry, we’ve become climate activists out of necessity. At Moyee, we believe the root cause of deforestation – and the climate change deforestation catalyzes – is poverty. When coffee production revenue is too low to support farming families, farmers swap their semi agroforestry coffee production for cattle or food production that can feed their children. 

co2_positive.png

This is the great conundrum of the global coffee industry today. 

Big Coffee companies generate huge profits for themselves while at the same time push millions of farmers under the poverty level, resulting in even more deforestation and even greater climate change. It’s one of the most vicious circles of our time. 

Our goal is to prove a business model possible that turns negative externalities into positive externalities. In addition to signing a pledge for net zero emissions

Our ENVIRONMENTAL To Do List

  1. Replace our air transport from Addis by ship like we did with our Kenyan Coffees. 
  2. Up cycle the coffee husk at farm level to natural fertilizer, baking powder and pectine. Unveil Ethiopia’s first solar- powered wet mill.
  3. Kickstart our low-carbon coffee project in collaboration with the Kenyan Coffee research Institute, Agriterra and the FairChain Foundation with the support by the Dutch Government.
  4. We will boost our climate positivity by another 988 tons through our FairChain Caffeinated Reforestation Program, beginning with 247 hectares in Mizan, Ethiopia. This program addresses the dilemma of scale, farmer living income and biodiversity protecting through ingrowing. 
  5. Potentially creating a profitable blueprint for the Ethiopian coffee sector capable of elevating 1 million farmers out of poverty and transforming 3.6 million ‘lost’ hectares of forest into profitable semi agroforestry farms with increased biodiversity.

More Short Reads about our impact

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Our Social Impact

Our Social Impact
taking a living income as basis

Lets Fix the Future! (2/3)

In this series, you can find 3 blogposts that shortly explain our main impact pillars, economic, social, and environmental impact or Factories – Farmers – Forests.  

It’s called ‘Let’s Fix the Future!’ because a lot needs to be fixed. COVID-19 raised all sorts of havoc, but maybe most of all it unveiled society’s deep social riffs and the ever-rising inequality that is leading to ever-greater poverty, deforestation, and climate change. One thing is clear: now more than ever we need better business models designed to solve these problems rather than continue to add to them.

With FairChain and Moyee, we’re building our company around Economic, Social and Environmental impact. How this is impacting us and, well, you, is in the report. We hope we can inspire you to make a difference, and please feel free to give us your feedback. 

Thanks for supporting us over the years and…. Let’s Fix the Future together.

Cheers!
Guido & Team Moyee

Let's talk numbers!

We started Moyee Coffee as a social enterprise, a business whose main objective was to deliver social impact and not shareholder profit. In those early days, when we first began to champion the cause of the smallholder coffee farmer we started offering, 20% premiums on coffee beans,  twice what any other fair trade or ethical endeavor was offering.  We thought this was pioneering and considered ourselves serious crusaders but little did we know.

By working with 100 smallholders in rural Ethiopia to improve the quality of their beans, we soon realized that our 20% premium was not nearly enough to provide our farmers with a decent income – not by a long shot! While our premium was helping farmers increase their annual coffee revenues from €400 to €500 our work with the farmers and research into a living income helped us understand that most coffee farmers would need to double and even triple take home pay from coffee to provide for the basic needs of food, health, education, shelter and a little savings that their families would need to escape poverty.  We quickly realised that  rather than the ‘the world’s fairest coffee company’ a more truthful description might have been to describe ourselves as  ‘the world’s least unfair coffee company.’ Put simply, we went back to the drawing board to radically update our theory of change. In close collaboration with the FairChain Foundation, we developed a program that would “bring a living income to farmers by managing profitable farms and getting involved in value adding activities in order to improve the livelihoods and communities. We pivoted thus from a 20% FairChain Premium towards a Living Income Differential. 

Real impactful change, a living income for our farmers we realised will take time but we’re on a journey and season by season we are helping more and more farmers and their families to thrive while growing the finest fairchain coffee beans that are good for planet and people.  Looking back over the past few years, we have continuously questioned the significance of our social impact. We are learning by doing. Our 20% FairChain premium payments have of course grown as our sales volumes have grown, which directly benefits farmers and their communities. We also know that this premium isn’t enough. Which is why we are focused on a concept we call the Living Income Differential, which gives us a much better understanding of our impact and how much we have closed the gap towards a living income.  We track our progress in three clear ways: 

Raketje_Social.png
0

Premium paid

In 2020, we paid out €78.236 in FairChain premiums for our Ethiopian and Kenyan blends. On average we paid 300% more than the Fairtrade minimum price to our Ethiopian farmers . In Kenya we pay 20% on top of the farmer coop selling price set with other buyers. 

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Living income differential

Last year, we invested €115,505 in our Living Income program. Bringing the total to €666.678 since the beginning of our program. 

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farmers in living income program

By 2020 we have grown the number of our FairChain farmers in Ethiopia to 568 but also introduced sustainable composting to 2,500 Kenyan coffee farmers who will soon be supplying us with a low chemical coffee to be  FairChain coffee. 

moyee is the only coffee company that places a living income at the core of what we do and has the proof to show the progres

A living income is defined as sufficient income generated by a household to afford a decent standard of living for the household members. Elements of a decent standard of living include: a nutritious diet, water, decent housing, education, healthcare, transport, clothing and other essential needs, including a provision for unexpected events.Because the road to a living income is not straight, we invest in a wide variety of activities to increase our odds of succeeding. Higher prices are only part of the solution – higher yields, lower production and living costs are needed as well.

The investment are admittedly high in the beginning, but become less as we reap the quality, yield and price benefits of our interventions. The average income for an Ethiopian farming family of 7 is €521 annually. Our living income benchmark is €1,055, which is based on coffee and non coffee incomes earned by our farmers in Limmu, Ethiopia. Since we began researching living income in our chain we have made it the central focus of our interventions. It has not always been easy to establish benchmarks due to, among other things, a bad harvest in 2018. So we created a pool of 100 farmers in Limmu to better assess the impact of our interventions. Before our interventions, these farmers earned €267 annually from coffee. Our intervention increased their income to €598. Close to what is need for a living income, but in 2019 it dropped dramatically to go up again in 2020.

While continuing to work closely with and carefully monitor the progress of Limu 1 farmers, we have also begun a new living income intervention with 200 Ethiopian farmers (Limu 2). In 2021, we will expand our living income program to 12,000 farmers in southern Ethiopia and 2,600 farmers in Kenya. During this time, we will also unveil a campaign to reach new roasters to embrace and test our model. 

The FairChain model aims to help farmers achieve living incomes not only by improving quality and yields but also by lowering production costs, invest in digitization, access to credit and healthcare. On top of that our coffee tree planting has the aim to double farmer income . We believe that the FairChain model has the potential to replace development aid in countries rich in natural resources, such as coffee.

Our social To Do List

We are very much learning by doing. This is all new territory for us as well, but we know where we are heading. By 2025, we aim to have 5,000 farmers on a credible road to a living income while also proving that all of our first wave of farmers in our program have indeed closed the poverty gap.

As we progress we plan to:  

  • Open two new wet mills in Ethiopia and scale up the FairChain Farmer program to include another 1,000 farmer
  • Scale the FairChain Farming activities in Kenya (and soon Colombia) 
  • Conduct a new Living Income Study in Ethiopia and create a Living Income Reference Price for Ethiopian coffee 
  • Introduce a new value-adding activity for farmers: husk processing to turn the fruit waste from the coffee cherry into a viable source of income for farmers such as compost for mushrooms or the fermentation and creation of pectin
  • Unveil the first blockchain-powered micro loan to our farmers. 
  • Launch version 2 of our unique farmer dashboard to create a direct relationship between coffee producers and coffee consumers and track our impact #storyproving. 

Aside from all that we actually want to encourage other coffee companies to follow our lead, adopt our open-source methodology and technology and put another 5,000 farmers on the road to a living income.

MORE SHORT READS ABOUT OUR IMPACT

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Our Economic Impact

Our Economic Impact
valuable jobs and a proud future for the youth without the need for development aid.

Lets Fix the Future! (1/3)

 

In this series, you can find 3 blogposts that shortly explain our main impact pillars, economic, social, and environmental impact or Factories – Farmers – Forests.  

It’s called ‘Let’s Fix the Future!’ because a lot needs to be fixed. COVID-19 raised all sorts of havoc, but maybe most of all it unveiled society’s deep social riffs and the ever-rising inequality that is leading to ever-greater poverty, deforestation and climate change. One thing is clear: now more than ever we need better business models designed to solve these problems rather than continue to add to them.

With FairChain and Moyee, we’re building our company around Economic, Social and Environmental impact. How this is impacting us and, well, you, is in the report. We hope we can inspire you to make a difference, and please feel free to give us your feedback. 

Thanks for supporting us over the years and…. Let’s Fix the Future together.

Cheers!
Guido & Team Moyee

Let's talk numbers!

Currently, only 10% of the value of your average cup of coffee remains in the country of origin, which, when you think about it, it’s absurd! 

By investing in value-adding activities like roasting and packaging at origin, we not only help coffee-growing countries evolve from primary (agro) to secondary (industrial) economies and create the valuable jobs that go with this evolution, but we also help 5 times more income stay in local hands island helping growing countries  to prosper through trade not aid. We believe coffee-growing countries should claim their invaluable positions in the coffee supply chain. They have every right to demand to be equal partners. It’s their coffee, after all. 

To measure the economic impact of FairChain we’ve created a fairly simple framework with four main impact indicators:

Raketje_Eco.png
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Jobs supported

By the end of 2020 we were supporting 61 value-adding jobs across our roasteries in Ethiopia and Kenya. That’s pretty impressive considering we began with 18 jobs in 2015. This number represents the jobs created by opening local roasteries and sustaining those jobs over the years.

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Beans exported

Last year we roasted a whopping 77,003 kg in Ethiopia and Kenya – that’s up from just 2,180 kg in Ethiopia in 2015. This number represents the number of kilo’s exported from Ethiopia and Kenya to elsewhere.

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Left at origin

By roasting locally, we leave behind more than 5 times as much value in country of origin compared to industry average. In practical terms this meant in 2020 that €575,000 of profits and income stayed in Ethiopia and Kenyan hands as against just €19,000 in 2015.

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CUPS DRANK

If we measure FairChain awareness by cups, then in 2020 that awareness rings in at 13.6 million cups. This is the number of cups of FairChain coffee drank by our friends and fans. This is a radical increase from 3.7 million cups in 2015. We like to think we sparked a bona fide FairChain movement. Our ambition is to inspire consumers to make conscious decisions that have real impact. 

50% awesome coffee, 50% experiment but 100% the future of business

FairChain is both a voice and a fist against a system where development aid subsidizes global corporations that refuse to share their wealth.

But why should the burden of solving poverty, deforestation and climate change fall exclusively on governments and NGOs when Big Coffee corporations are pocketing enormous profits?

Why should the rich get richer and the poor poorer? When coffee is the world’s most consumed beverage and its second most valuable commodity, why can’t coffee farming be profitable in its own right and coffee-growing countries enjoy trade instead of aid? And why can’t we consumers not sip guilt-free premium coffee at reasonable prices? The answer to all these questions is: we can. 

Welcome to the world of Moyee and our FairChain approach to doing business.

It’s all fine and well to say we are striving for economic equality, but what does that actually mean? Good question! Our main driver is to rebalance the global coffee chain. At the heart of FairChain is a 50/50 approach that aims to create an equal value split between countries that produce coffee and countries that consume it.

Our economic To Do List

  1. Moyee aims to roast 300,000 kilograms a year. We aim to scale up from low-volume premium exporters (from Ethiopia and Kenya) to high-volume premium exporters. Our plan is to boost our roasting activities in Kenya and Colombia and raise the percentage of truly locally-roasted FairChain coffee to 90% (We will continue to roast small batches via our Amsterdam HQ in case of supply chain hiccups or for product development).
  2. Moyee will source all of its coffee directly from smallholders, offering the global coffee industry a blueprint on how to introduce profitable farming to the 5,5 million farmers that live below the poverty line.
  3. We aim to change the profile of our Impact Ecosystem so that it is less reliant of a single roastery in Ethiopia and can spread the risk of logistical hiccups across multiple roasteries.
  4. Combine our best practices in Holland, Ireland and Germany for a pan-European roll-out and make inroads into America. 

Moyee aims to champion the Fourth Wave of coffee and to lead with our regenerative and redistributive fairchain business model as the right approach for the 21st century to the profit obsessed model still being peddled by Big Coffee conglomerates.

Our healing, regenerative and redistributive business model will inspire many brands to follow our lead. Before you say we’re crazy, just think of how Beyond Meat is influencing the meat industry and Oatly the milk industry. Bravo! We aim to be this for coffee.

MORE SHORT READS ABOUT OUR IMPACT

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4TH WAVE OF COFFEE: FROM QUALITY TO EQUALITY

Fourth wave of coffee: from quality to equality

The popularity of coffee exploded, and now what??

Not only the consuming part, but also the preparation of it.
There are a million ways of drinking coffee. And even more ways of
harvesting, picking, roasting and brewing it.
The coffee industry exploded, and we are drinking more coffee than ever. 
With the number of almost two billion cups a day! 

And global demand for coffee is expected to triple by 2050. 

In the year 2021 we hit the period of what’s called the third wave of coffee. 
A time where the market’s focus is on providing us with more and better ways
to drink our daily brew. Bean to cup machines and free coffee at work,
coffee carts in our parks, farmers markets, international chains
and local independent artisan speciality coffee shops.
So to say, we are living in a golden age of coffee.

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cups of coffee are consumed every day

lets dive in some history:

The First Wave of coffee began in the 1800’s making it available to Western consumers. Before this people roasted, ground and brewed their own coffee beans at home but the establishment of the first commercial coffee companies, including Folgers and Maxwell House, drove mass coffee consumption – making it easier to make and easier to buy. It was a commodity market. For companies it was all about profit margins, for consumers at home all about convenience. 

The Second Wave began in the 1900s and introduced new varieties and new experiences, hitting full stride from the 1970s with the likes of Peets and Starbucks. Quality was definitely a focus of this wave and coffee terminology began to emerge with phrases like barista, latte and espresso.  These coffee chains promoted dark roasted blends produced from high quality beans and roasted in state of the art machines. Taste improved but a lot of the focus was on the experience, meeting friends and connecting over coffee and while coffee shop culture began to emerge some began  to complain that the experience sold by outlets such as Starbucks was outweighing the actual coffee. 

The Third wave, coined in 1999, was spearheaded by a small but growing number of coffee fans with a mindset closer to the wine industry, craft beer or select whiskeys.  The focus was on quality and the speciality of coffee beans and the various factors that can create and influence coffee’s flavour. 

Third Wave coffee has dominated much of the last decade – single origin espresso’s, direct sourced blends, exquisite pour overs and fruity filter coffees. The Third Wave of coffee, which firmly took root in countries like the US, Japan, Australia and much of Scandinavia is also known as ‘specialty coffee’ which seeks to highlight the unique characteristics that result from diversity of coffee bean cultivars, growing and cultivation methods, processing methods, roasting methods, and the variables in beverage preparations.

Third Wave coffee set the stage for the direct trade movement which cuts out middlemen and creates direct linkages between farmers, roasters and coffee shops. Direct trade does however tend to link roasters and coffee shops with already well off farmers. Coffee communities who already produce high quality high priced beans. Farmers who tend to be far better off than those living in extreme poverty and in full need of yield and quality support. 

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MOYEE WANTS TO START A REVOLUTION:THE FOURTH WAVE OF COFFEE

Moyee wants to especially focus on the farmers who need it the most-
the ones who do not meet the set requirements. Not those already earning
a living income but those the farthest from it.
Our goal at Moyee is to usher in a Fourth Wave of coffee,
where the focus is not only on quality but also on radical impact.

From quality to equality. A wave to support a living income for all smallholder coffee farmers and to encourage sustainable farming practices that can regenerate the already damaged habitats of the coffee belt.

the fourth wave of coffee: 
where the focus is on quality, and on making radical impact


are you in?

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economic


Economic Impact

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Social


Social Impact

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environmental


Environmental Impact